The Insufferable Gaucho Symbols & Objects

This Study Guide consists of approximately 39 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Insufferable Gaucho.
This section contains 419 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Insufferable Gaucho  Study Guide

The Flame-Eater

The flame-eater in “Jim” is a symbol of the inescapable presence of death in daily life and of the desire and interest in cheating death. Through his work, the flame-eater highlights how close we all are to death at all times.

Rabbits

The rabbits in “The Insufferable Gaucho” are symbols of a different, more animalistic world order and lifestyle in the pampas, outside the urban space of Buenos Aires, Argentina. The rabbit that Pereda sees attack another rabbit is an example of forewarning and foreboding, cautioning Pereda against his journey to the pampas.

Snow

The snow in “Two Catholic Tales” is, to the young narrator of “The Vocation” a symbol of religious purity, and to Vicente, left to survive on the streets, a dangerous threat to life.

Monk's Habit

The monk’s habit in “Two Catholic Tales” is, once again to the narrator of “The...

(read more)

This section contains 419 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Insufferable Gaucho  Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
The Insufferable Gaucho from BookRags. (c)2018 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook