The Inquisitor's Tale: Or, The Three Magical Children and Their Holy Dog Symbols & Objects

Adam Gidwitz
This Study Guide consists of approximately 60 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Inquisitor's Tale.
This section contains 541 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Inquisitor's Tale: Or, The Three Magical Children and Their Holy Dog Study Guide

The Burned Books

The burned books symbolize the loss of a great deal of Jewish wisdom. William talks about the way that the destruction of a single book is like the loss of several lives. He says this because the work of many people goes into creating a book, particularly in medieval times when books were copied by hand.

Gwenforte's Death

Gwenforte’s death is a symbol of needing to learn more about a person or a situation before jumping to conclusions, which is one of the author’s central themes. Because Jeanne’s parents did not look beyond the blood on Gwenforte’s coat, they assumed she had harmed Jeanne when she had actually saved her.

Etienne's Knife

Etienne’s knife is a symbol of his indecision about what to do with the children. He holds the knife while the children sleep and he thinks about...

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This section contains 541 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Inquisitor's Tale: Or, The Three Magical Children and Their Holy Dog Study Guide
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