Adam Gidwitz Writing Styles in The Inquisitor's Tale: Or, The Three Magical Children and Their Holy Dog

Adam Gidwitz
This Study Guide consists of approximately 60 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Inquisitor's Tale.
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Point of View

The Inquisitor’s Tale is told from several different points of view because there are several different people sharing stories about the children while gathered at the inn. Each story teller recounts their share of the story in the past tense. For the most part the story is told with a limited perspective since the story tellers do not share any insight into the thoughts of the children, but sometimes observe their emotions based on what they see. However, the nun, who is really God, is the exception. Her point of view is omniscient.

When the individual stories are interrupted by the narrator or someone else who is at the inn, the novel changes to present tense and the narrator speaks using the first person perspective. Once the children arrive at the Holy Cross-Roads Inn for the final time, the remainder of the novel is...

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This section contains 351 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy The Inquisitor's Tale: Or, The Three Magical Children and Their Holy Dog Study Guide
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