The Innocents Abroad - Chapter 11 Summary & Analysis

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Chapter 11 Summary

While the language and "foreign-ness" of the French people take some getting used to, Twain admits to impeccable customer service on behalf of the French. He notes that people of service, such as waiters, are always polite and always ready to please. By the same token, Twain is almost annoyed by so much service when he describes the routine of eating a simple meal at a restaurant. Rather than being served quickly and hustled out, the Americans find themselves eating long, drawn-out meals that include appetizers, main dishes, fruit, dessert and lots and lots of wine. Although a bit impatient with this practice, Twain becomes embarrassed by one of his party, who tries to overdo his French appreciation by announcing that, like the French, he never dines without wine. Twain notes that this statement isn't even true.

In addition to the meal customs...

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This section contains 460 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
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