The Greek Myths - Chapter 5, Homosexuality and the Laurel Leaf - No Connection Summary & Analysis

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Chapter 5, Homosexuality and the Laurel Leaf - No Connection Summary and Analysis

There are two men who captivated the love of gods. Narcissus and Hyacinth were renowned for their beauty. It was a known fact that there were some men, as well as many women who fell in love with each man. In the case of Hyacinth, the normally heterosexual god Apollo fell in love with him. Heracles, the hero, turns out to have been noticeably bisexual. He had wives and lovers who were women, and had sexually intimate involvements with more than one man as well during the course of his adult life. These variants on standard heterosexual practices are not elucidated.

Where Apollo is the Sun, Artemis is the Moon. In this pantheon, the two are viewed as siblings. From our current perspective, it would be closer to the truth to call both Earth and Moon children of the Sun, but it still doesn't look like that from the Earth's surface. During the crescent moon it is easy to see how it might be said that goddess Artemis asked her father Zeus for a silver bow which he granted. Zeus gave Artemis the opportunity to ask for what she'd like, and she did so. He gave her all that she asked for and then more, as he loved her so.

By this time in the exposition it has become evident that there is 'something going on with the laurel'. Control of the intoxicating laurel tree leaves, and the regulation of the use of this intoxicant was an actual cultural and political issue. While it was viewed as worthy of some legitimate usage, there were dangers, as depicted in stories of wild women tearing individuals to pieces. The text does not clarify whether the dangers were as prevalent as those associated with the use of alcohol - such as belligerence which is really rather common, or more akin to those previously mentioned rare but extreme occurrences.

This section contains 339 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
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