The Greek Myths - Chapter 3, Generations of Deities - Part 2 Summary & Analysis

This Study Guide consists of approximately 34 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Greek Myths.
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Chapter 3, Generations of Deities - Part 2 Summary and Analysis

There is also a recurring theme of incestuous relations among some of the gods. The relationship between Hera and her brother Zeus is a case in point. They are both offspring of Rhea and Cronos. Despite the fact that they are siblings, they come to be husband and wife to one another as well. There are versions of the story where their union is depicted as having been his raping her, but in other versions it is actually that she wants her brother for her husband, at least in part to consolidate power in the family and with love and passion. He does have other lovers during their marriage, but they never divorce—only his sister is his wife. In this edition, the marriage is viewed as only taking place because Hera is so ashamed of having been raped by Zeus. The other least palatable theme is that destruction of offspring by the father to prevent usurpation by the children. The mother often colludes with her young, which does lead to the downfall of the father, just as he feared. In fact, this is how Zeus was saved from destruction by Cronos - Time. Rhea gave birth to him and hid him. She then substituted a large rock for the baby and Cronos consumed it, just as he had her previous children. Later, having grown up in secret, Zeus returns. Vengeance is done. To everyone's amazement, Zeus' siblings are all released from Cronos unharmed. It is as if this story is a prophecy about the simple fact that, despite the demise that era of Grecian culture and religion, just as Greece is still a real nation with plenty of people, many living 2,000 years after Jesus Christ and 1,500 years after Mohammed, many people have still heard of the children of Cronos and Rhea, including Zeus and Hera.

At this point, for the sake of orderliness, the chapter titles will be listed as they appear in the Table of Contents up to the point which is currently covered. Forward, Introduction, 1. The Pelasgian Myth, 2. The Homeric and Orphic Creation Myth, 3. The Olympian Creation Myth, 4. Two Philosophical Creation Myths, 5. The Five Ages of Man, 6. The Castration of Uranus, 7. The Dethronement of Cronus, 8. The Birth of Athene, 9. Zeus and Metis, 10. The Fates, 11. The Birth of Aphrodite, 12. Hera and Her Children. 13. Zeus and Hera. These have been covered in the previous summary chapters. Please note that there are three common spellings for the god of Time: Cronus, Chronos, Cronos. There are two common spellings for the goddess of Athens: Athene, and Athena. The nation of Libya is featured as a source of these deities, especially of Athena. These will be delved into in greater detail during the rest of the summary.

This section contains 474 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
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