The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris - Chapter Ten: Madness Summary & Analysis

David McCullough
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Chapter Ten: Madness Summary and Analysis

Terms of the surrender called for all French soldiers to give up their arms. As long as the French disarmed, there would be no occupation by the Germans. It was the worst defeat in France's history. Over 150,000 soldiers were either killed or wounded. France would be made to pay a war indemnity of five billion francs and turn over the provinces of Alsace and Lorraine. Although there was much bewilderment and bitterness among the French, many Americans, like Olin Warner, felt relief that the war had ended. The populace began to feel relief from shipments of food and supplies that began to arrive. Washburne reported back to his American superiors that Paris was on the rebound. Washburne received praise from the state department for his efforts during the war.

On March 1st, the Germans marched into Paris...

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This section contains 711 words
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