The Great Frustration - The Scribes’ Lament Summary & Analysis

Seth Fried
This Study Guide consists of approximately 50 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Great Frustration.
This section contains 1,117 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Great Frustration Study Guide

Summary

The story begins with a quote from a famous scribe from the 18th century, Benjamin Thorpe, stating that scribes were illiterate and inaccurate in their translations of Anglo-Saxon texts with Beowulf being the worst.

The narrator, part of a team of monks, described Brother Ælfric re-enacting the monster Grendel from Beowulf. The monks had been given the task of transcribing Ælfric’s performances. On seeing one of the scribes, Brother Wigbert, drop his quill, Ælfric decided to include him in the play by chasing him and pretending to disembowel him while telling the other monks to capture his death-cry. Wigbert, being of a sensitive disposition, appeared traumatized during this interaction. The narrator related that prior to meeting Brother Ælfric, the monks had expected a quiet, disciplined scholar. This had turned out to be far from the case as everyday he acted out...

(read more from the The Scribes’ Lament Summary)

This section contains 1,117 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Great Frustration Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
The Great Frustration from BookRags. (c)2021 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.