The Frogs, and Other Plays. Translated with an Introd. by David Barrett - Study Guide The Poet and the Women, Part 2 Summary & Analysis

This Study Guide consists of approximately 28 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Frogs, and Other Plays. Translated with an Introd. by David Barrett.
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At this point, Mnesilochus stands up and argues that Euripides is, as they would all admit, quite right about the women's crimes and they are lucky that Euripides hasn't even told the half odf the evil the women perform behind their men's backs. He tells the women imaginary accounts of his own crimes; foremost among them the rude adultery he has committed while his imaginary husband was away on military service. The other women are outraged at the cousin's accusations, but realizing that he is speaking the truth about the evil of women, they don't know how to respond. One woman who is outraged by the cousin's accusations argues that they should continue to prosecute Euripides and to also put this woman to death for being a traitor and for defending Euripides. Mnesilochus, realizing that he had...

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This section contains 1,163 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Frogs, and Other Plays. Translated with an Introd. by David Barrett Study Guide
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