The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery - Chapter 8 Summary & Analysis

Eric Foner
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Chapter 8 Summary and Analysis

Chapter eight shows how as part of the Emancipation Proclamation, Lincoln cleared the way for blacks to serve in the military. Originally planning on keeping the blacks to a labor role, Lincoln quickly changed his mind and encouraged blacks to enlist as soldiers. Thousands of young black men enlisted in the military at a salary less than the white soldiers. Lincoln signed into law a bill that dictated that black soldiers were to be treated equally as white soldiers. This outlook led to Lincoln's first meeting with Frederick Douglass in August of 1863. Lincoln's meeting with Douglass was one of many Lincoln would have with intelligent, accomplished black men during his presidency. Through these meetings, Lincoln's opinions on race began to change.

In 1864, Maryland abolished slavery. West Virginia, which had committed to a gradual emancipation of its slaves, abolished slavery the following...

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This section contains 502 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery Study Guide
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