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The Fate of Liberty Quotes

Mark E. Neely, Jr.
This Study Guide consists of approximately 71 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Fate of Liberty.
This section contains 1,103 words
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Quotes

"In detecting the sincerity in Lincoln's first message to Congress, Randall uncovered only part of the deeper meaning of the document. What is also apparent in it is the work of a fledgling president, uncertain of his legal ground and his proper audience, nervous, and at once too candid and too forthcoming. This was not the work of a statesman or of a sure politician. Lincoln would learn fast, but he had not mastered the job by July 1861." Chapter 1, pg. 13

"Federal authorities early on developed terms to describe the three important classes of prisoners held in military prisons: 'prisoners of war' were captured Confederate soldiers and sailors; 'United States prisoners' were members of the U.S. armed services held for crimes committed in camp, like theft or murder; 'prisoners of state' were civilians. Consistent use of the terms, however, was confined to those who administered military...

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This section contains 1,103 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Fate of Liberty Study Guide
Copyrights
The Fate of Liberty from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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