The Fate of Liberty - Study Guide Chapter 7 Summary & Analysis

Mark E. Neely, Jr.
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Chapter 7, "The Revival of International Law," looks systematically and episodically at the complexities of dealing with blockade-runners and hostages, questions raised earlier. The number of vessels seized by the Union rises steadily throughout the war, but the number of prisoners lags by 80%, because the U.S. adheres to principles laid down in textbooks like Halleck's. Neutral ships and cargoes may be confiscated, but neutral crewmen are personally inviolable. Early on, Turner extends this to contraband traders and smugglers plying inland waters. Britain continues importing cotton to feed its industrial growth, and some Southerners serve on multinational crews. Seward advises Welles against demanding seamen vow not to resume blockade running as a condition of release. They may be detained only to serve as legal witnesses and then may not be treated as POWs. The U.S. cannot afford to provoke Britain into allying with...

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This section contains 1,180 words
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