Eoin Colfer Writing Styles in The Eternity Code

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Point of View

The point of view in "The Eternity Code" is recounted from the third-person and omniscient perspective. This is proven by the fact that an unidentified narrator who does not actively appear in the narrative tells the story. Additionally, the narrator is privy to the thoughts and feelings of all of the characters, alternating between them to share inner workings with the reader. This is important as it allows the reader to know all of the angles of the story; however, some secrets are kept by the narrator's tactic of switching focus before a character's plans and intentions are fully revealed.

This novel is written using a fairly equal amount of exposition and dialogue. This is effective as the dialogue shows the interactions between characters which frequently explains their motivations. Meanwhile, the exposition serves to describe the characters' thoughts and plots which further provides motivation as well as foreshadowing. The viewpoint of the novel focuses primarily on Artemis Fowl and Jon Spiro, but it also alternates to other characters, particularly Holly, Mulch and Juliet.

Setting

"The Eternity Code" is set in the real world, predominantly in Chicago, London and Ireland. The characters consist of humans such as Artemis, a criminal genius, and his bodyguards, Butler and Juliet, as well as Jon Spiro, an American businessman suspected of nefarious dealings. Other characters include elves, dwarves and a centaur. Interestingly, the human characters tend to be criminals whilst the fairy creatures are members of the police who try to curtail the criminals' illegal activities. A large portion of the narrative is motivated by the humans' focus on obtaining wealth through whatever means necessary.

Fowl Manor in Ireland is Artemis's ancestral home. This is where Holly takes Butler to recuperate when she uses healing magic to save his life after Blunt shoots him. Jon Spiro also sends Mulch and Loafers to Fowl Manor to kidnap Artemis, and at the end of the novel, this is where the mind wipes take place. En Fin is the restaurant in Knightsbridge, London where Artemis arranges a business meeting with Jon Spiro which ends with Blunt shooting Butler. Haven City is the underground home of Holly and the other fairy people. They are put on lockdown after the C Cube pinges their security system, so Holly is sent to the surface to locate the source of the ping. Ice Age Cryogenics Institute is the only cryogenics center in Knightsbridge with empty units, so Artemis rents the mobile unit for one night to store Butler after he is shot to give Holly a chance to heal him. Juliet's final mission to graduate from Madame Ko's bodyguard training camp takes place in Sfax, Tunisia in North Africa. Juliet fails the test, but Artemis contacts her to alert her that Butler needs her. Located in Chicago, the Spiro Needle is home to Fission Chips and Jon Spiro, so it is set up with the world's best security system. This is where Spiro stores the C Cube, but when he brings Artemis to the Spiro Needle to unlock the eternity code, Artemis and his associates concoct a plan to retrieve the C Cube. Jon Spiro meets Artemis at the O'Hare International Airport in Chicago when Artemis arrives from Ireland with Mulch to unlock the C Cube. Pex and Chips bury Mulch alive in a vacant lot in the Malthouse Industrial Estates in Chicago, but Mulch digs his way out. Phonetix is Spiro's main competitor, and when Holly mesmerizes Pex and Chips to suggest Spiro should use the C Cube to access and steal their schematics for future projects, Spiro jumps at the chance. Unfortunately for him, this is part of Artemis's plan to retrieve the C Cube and set Spiro up to be arrested.

Language and Meaning

The language used in this novel is casual and informal. Sentences are constructed fairly properly. The style of language utilized is chosen because it is comprehensive for the target audience of teenagers and young adults. This is reinforced by the fact that the narrators speak like typical modern teenagers, creating a familiarity between the narrators and the audience. This choice of language aids readers' comprehension as it makes the novel very easy to understand. The more difficult or fantastical concepts are fully explained, allowing readers to immerse themselves in the world of "The Eternity Code" where fairies exist and try to hide their existence. This alternate reality is easy to accept because of the similarities with the readers' real world.

The language utilized in the novel tends to characterize the characters as well as their motivations, maintaining a focus on the protagonist, Artemis Fowl, and the antagonist, Jon Spiro, as well as the constant discrepancies in their goals. This novel is written using a fairly equal amount of exposition and dialogue. This is effective as the dialogue shows the interactions between characters which frequently explains their motivations. Meanwhile, the exposition serves to describe the characters' thoughts and plots which further provides motivation as well as foreshadowing. The language used enhances comprehension of the novel's concepts and, overall, makes the narrative quite easy to understand.

Structure

This novel is comprised of a Prologue, twelve chapters and an Epilogue which are divided into two parts: Attack and Counterattack. The book consists of 309 pages. The chapters range from two to fifty-five pages, averaging around twenty-five pages in length, and they are all titled to foreshadow the contents of the chapter. The chapters are generally long and very detailed. The entire book occurs over a period of several days, so most of the chapters span a brief period of several hours.

"The Eternity Code" by Eoin Coiffer is the third book in the Artemis Fowl series. After Jon Spiro steals the C Cube, a super computer built by Artemis Fowl using fairy technology, the fairies must help Artemis retrieve it, lest Spiro learn the secrets of their existence. "The Eternity Code" is an entertaining account of the criminal ventures of a thirteen-year-old genius. The novel is quick-paced and easy to read. It is mostly linear, but some background information is provided, and several flashbacks occur in the form of Artemis Fowl's diary entries. Overall, this novel is very entertaining and enjoyable.

This section contains 1,036 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
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