Related Topics

The Eichmann Trial - Chapter 6, Conclusion Summary & Analysis

This Study Guide consists of approximately 27 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Eichmann Trial.
This section contains 1,021 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Eichmann Trial Study Guide

Hannah Arendt was a journalist for the "New Yorker" when the Eichmann trial began. She had been incarcerated briefly at the beginning of the war but was able to flee to New York where she taught and wrote. She proposed that she cover the trial for the "New Yorker" thought she knew it would be a "personal" journey. Arendt was born into a family of affluent German Jews but said they never talked about that ethnicity. Arendt held the view that totalitarian regimes held people captive so that they would do anything ordered, even murder and torture, without questioning the orders. She also believed that the members of a totalitarian society would also perceive horrific acts as necessary. That said, Arendt took the stand that the trial should only encompass acts that could be directly linked to Eichmann. She did not believe that...

(read more from the Chapter 6, Conclusion Summary)

This section contains 1,021 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Eichmann Trial Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
The Eichmann Trial from BookRags. (c)2014 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.