Study Guide

The Discourses - Book Three, The Example of Rome's Great Men, Internal Security, Equanimity, Insurrection, Confidence, Electioneering, and the Tendering of Advice, Advice to Generals in the Field Summary & Analysis

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Sections 24-30 deal with internal security. Machiavelli argues that extensive military commands made Rome servile. In some cases, the poverty of many Roman farmers led them to think themselves great leaders, like Cincinnatus. Women have often brought downfall to states. Unity can be brought to a divided city to kill the ringleaders of the opposition or banish them. Reconciliation is the worst strategy.

Strict watch should be kept over citizen activities, because tyranny often arises from supposed good works because ingratiating one's self to the people makes them more content to give up their liberties. The faults...

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This section contains 352 words
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The Discourses from Nonfiction Classics for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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