Study Guide

The Discourses - Study Guide Book One, The Development of Rome's Constitution, Sundry Reflections on the Kings of Rome, The Introduction of New Forms of Government, Ingratitude Summary & Analysis

This Study Guide consists of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Discourses.
This section contains 337 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy The Discourses Study Guide

Sections 19-24 contain reflections on the Kings of Rome relevant to political theory and practice. Weak princes who follow good princes can rule well, but weak princes who follow other weak princes cannot preserve order. Machiavelli illustrates with examples. A good prince who follows another can achieve great things.

This is particularly true in well-governed republics whose institutions produce good succession. Rome's elective system is a good example. Princes and republics that lack their own armies were hated and are pathetic. A prince should never risk all of one's fortunes on anything but the entirety of the regime's armed forces; thus, defending passes...

(read more from the Book One, The Development of Rome's Constitution, Sundry Reflections on the Kings of Rome, The Introduction of New Forms of Government, Ingratitude Summary)

This section contains 337 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy The Discourses Study Guide
Copyrights
Nonfiction Classics for Students
The Discourses from Nonfiction Classics for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook