The Death and Life of Great American Cities - Part 3, Chapter 13, The Self-Destruction of Diversity Summary & Analysis

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Part 3, Chapter 13, The Self-Destruction of Diversity Summary and Analysis

Jacobs states that diversity is inherently required for city life to work in a constructive manner, and provides the basis for the perpetuation of the city. Although the responsibility for public use entities such as schools, parks, community centers and more is to be undertaken by public and "quasi-public" sources, it is the individual city dweller and the various private organizations, each with their own diverse contributions and needs that create city diversity. City planners should try to provide the framework for this variety of uses.

There are forces that tend to destroy diversity. Jacobs describes four forces. First, diversity can destroy itself. The area becomes too popular and there is competition for the available space. Streets are most affected by retail competition, while districts are affected by competition over working...

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This section contains 507 words
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Buy The Death and Life of Great American Cities Study Guide
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