The Consolation of Philosophy - Book II Summary & Analysis

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Book II Summary

Philosophy diagnoses Boethius' spiritual troubles as a longing for his lost fortune. She points out that Fortune is a "monster" that seems to take pleasure in its own predictability and loves upsetting men just when they get comfortable with their possessions. She reminds Boethius that he, when he was still blessed with riches and comforts, made many similar arguments. However, it is understandable that such a sudden turn of events should upset him, but it is time for him to stop moping and think correctly about the situation. She guesses that he probably feels as if Fortune has changed its attitude towards him, but he is mistaken; Fortune treats all equally, because it is utterly indifferent and chaotic. Further, he should not really feel that he has lost anything, for he should know that he never really owned anything. All that...

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This section contains 1,430 words
(approx. 4 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Consolation of Philosophy Study Guide
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