The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America Setting & Symbolism

Richard Rothstein
This Study Guide consists of approximately 60 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Color of Law.
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The U.S.Constitution

The U.S. Constitution was ratified in 1788, and is the primary document for the creation, structure, and policy of the U.S. federal government and legal system. The Constitution, and notably the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments are essential to Rothstein's argument about de jure residential racial segregation, because the varied interpretations of these amendments both empowered and stopped residential racial segregation in the United States.

The U.S. Supreme Court

The U.S. Supreme Court is the highest court in the United States of America. The decision and rulings made by the Supreme Court can only be overturned by the Supreme Court. The multiple rulings, sometimes contradictory, of the Supreme Court hat are related to housing policy and racial segregation are essential to Rothstein's argument regarding de jure residential racial segregation.

San Francisco Bay Area

The San Francisco Bay Area describes the larger...

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This section contains 672 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America Study Guide
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