Study Guide

Doris Kearns Goodwin Writing Styles in The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism

Doris Kearns Goodwin
This Study Guide consists of approximately 84 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism.
This section contains 448 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
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Point of View

The point of view of the author is that of the dispassionate historian relating important events in as even-handed a manner as possible. It is similar to the point of view of journalists, who are said to write the first draft of history. But her history includes the very human natures of various important key figures from the president to a city mayor, the role that wives and family play in affecting how key players act and react. The detached point of view allows the reader to accept the narrator as a factual and authoritative source of information, and as a key to unraveling the often-complicated tangle of personalities, political parties, courts and Congress in making American history in this era. Most importantly, the objective viewpoint enables the author to treat the multiple characters as individuals, rather than simply political actors.

Language and Meaning

The...

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This section contains 448 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism Study Guide
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