Study Guide

The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism Quotes

Doris Kearns Goodwin
This Study Guide consists of approximately 84 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism.
This section contains 2,326 words
(approx. 6 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism Study Guide

Under Roosevelt's Square Deal the country had awakened to the need for government action to allay problems caused by industrialization—an awakening spurred in part by the dramatic exposés of a talented group of investigative journalists he famously labeled 'muckrakers.
-- author (Chapter 1 paragraph Page 12, paragraph 1)

Importance: This quote introduces the concept of progressivism and shows connection between an aware press and a responsive politics.

Has Roosevelt reached the pinnacle of his fame, or is he to move forward to fresh conquests? It rests with him. He is at the height of his mental and physical powers. He possesses a great influence over the masses of his countrymen. Such power is a tremendous weapon for goof or evil. How will he wield it?
-- Baltimore Sun (Chapter 1 paragraph 3)

Importance: This portion of an editorial from the Baltimore Sun in 1912 indicates the power Roosevelt has over the Republican Party as he contemplates whether to seek a third term as president. Taft is...

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This section contains 2,326 words
(approx. 6 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism Study Guide
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