Study Guide

The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism - Chapter 29: "Armageddon" Summary & Analysis

Doris Kearns Goodwin
This Study Guide consists of approximately 84 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism.
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Summary

From the outset, there were contradictions and paradoxes in the NPP. Roosevelt gave permission to states in the Old South to send only white delegates, although blacks from the north were admitted. Roosevelt rationalized his position by saying that racial progress would come only when unnamed "high-minded white men" in southern states decided to allow blacks to participate. He was also criticized for trying to give life to a national party using a sectionalist, or regional, approach. On most of the big progressive issues, however, there was near unanimity. The NPP convention drew people not usually seen at political conventions—young people, liberated women, suffragettes, social workers. And it was also clear from the outset that this was Roosevelt's party; he was the sole reason for its existence.

At the party's first convention in Chicago, Roosevelt repeated the themes of his candidacy: an...

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This section contains 937 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism Study Guide
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