Study Guide

The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism - Chapter 27: "My Hat is in the Ring" Summary & Analysis

Doris Kearns Goodwin
This Study Guide consists of approximately 84 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism.
This section contains 1,139 words
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Summary

Lincoln Steffens compared Roosevelt to Hamlet because of his apparent inability to make up his mind about whether to run for president. Meanwhile, the writer claimed, Roosevelt was "mussing up" the progressive movement by his indecision. At a standing-room-only appearance at Carnegie Hall with other progressives and journalists, Senator La Follette expressed his anger that Roosevelt was using Taft as a stalking horse, or a test of his own potential strength if he should attempt a run for president. Others worried that, if both Roosevelt and La Follette were in the race it would only serve to split the progressive vote and help Democrats. Pinchot and others tried unsuccessfully to convince La Follette to withdraw his candidacy.

La Follette delivered a drunken soliloquy before the annual meeting of the Periodical Publishers' Association in Philadelphia on corporate power and...

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This section contains 1,139 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism Study Guide
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