Study Guide

The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism - Chapter 21: "Kingmaker and King" Summary & Analysis

Doris Kearns Goodwin
This Study Guide consists of approximately 84 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism.
This section contains 820 words
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Summary

As support for Taft's nomination grew across the country, he cast aside his diffidence and began to campaign like a pro. He asked West Virginia Gov. William Dawson for his endorsement, condensed his speeches, engaged in lighthearted banter with the press and generally became more comfortable in the role of politician. When it appeared that New York Governor Hughes was gaining some traction in his quest for the GOP nomination, President Roosevelt scheduled a special message to Congress on the same day that Hughes was to deliver a major campaign address. In his speech to Congress, Roosevelt excoriated the body for its failure to act on his recommendations, blasted the Supreme Court for its finding that the 1906 Employers' Liability Act was unconstitutional and challenged Congress to enact a new liability law to protect workers.

Taft's presidential push encountered a major roadblock...

(read more from the Chapter 21: "Kingmaker and King" Summary)

This section contains 820 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism Study Guide
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