Study Guide

The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism - Chapter 20: "Taft boom, Wall Street Bust" Summary & Analysis

Doris Kearns Goodwin
This Study Guide consists of approximately 84 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism.
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Summary

Roosevelt encountered heavy resistance to his programs by the ultra-conservative wing of the Republican Party. Specifically, Congress only considered a small fraction of the 60 initiatives the president recommended in his 1906 state of the union address. Legislation to establish an eight-hour work day, outlaw child labor, end corporate contributions in federal elections, enact a Philippine tariff law, pass an inheritance tax and establish a progressive income tax were blocked or stalled in Congress. The final straw was passage by the Senate of an amendment to the agricultural appropriations act that canceled the president's executive power to create six new western national parks. But Roosevelt figured out a stratagem to salvage his conservationist measures. At the 11th hour before the amendment was to take effect, Roosevelt signed an executive order that prevented development on 16 million acres set aside for national parks...

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This section contains 868 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism Study Guide
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