Study Guide

The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism - Chapter 19: "To Cut Mr. Taft in Two" Summary & Analysis

Doris Kearns Goodwin
This Study Guide consists of approximately 84 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism.
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Summary

Taft testified before Congress for two days on a bill regarding the Philippine Islands tariff. The measure passed the House but died in the Senate, to Taft's serious disappointment. Faced with a pending vacancy on the Supreme Court, Roosevelt was inclined to appoint Taft because he thought this was Taft's ultimate career objective. However, the waters became muddied as Taft sought advice from friends and family about whether to accept the appointment and end his political career, or decline and possibly run for president. Roosevelt talked with Taft's wife, Nelie, who was opposed to her husband joining the court and decided to leave the matter entirely up to his friend from Cincinnati.

The waters became even more clouded as several newspapers began touting Taft as the most likely Republican presidential candidate to defeat Democrat William Jennings Bryan. But...

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This section contains 728 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism Study Guide
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