Study Guide

The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism - Chapter 11: "The Most Famous Woman in America" Summary & Analysis

Doris Kearns Goodwin
This Study Guide consists of approximately 84 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism.
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Summary

McClure's Magazine ushered in a new age of muckraking journalism in its January 1903 issue. Ida Tarbell reported on the predatory practices of Standard Oil. Lincoln Steffens exposed the illegal dealings of Minneapolis Mayor Albert Anes. And Ray Baker demonstrated the manipulation and deception of union members by their bosses. It was a powerful journalistic debut, and one that re-energized Roosevelt in his pursuit of the trusts.

McClure himself published a stinging editorial denouncing corruption that riddles American society from churches to colleges to courts to government and to politicians. That issue of the magazine far exceeded McClure's expectations in terms of readership, public impact and credibility. Readers across the country were astonished at the revelations, and looked upon the magazine as a source of truth and right-minded reform. Its reputation soared through the stratosphere.

A young writer from...

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This section contains 1,039 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism Study Guide
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