Study Guide

The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism - Chapter 10: "That Damned Cowboy is President" Summary & Analysis

Doris Kearns Goodwin
This Study Guide consists of approximately 84 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism.
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Summary

Although Roosevelt pledged publicly to sustain and move forward the policies of the slain President McKinley, conservatives in the Republican party were nervous that he might go off on a "liberal" tangent and somehow threaten their wealth and status. To a hand-picked group of journalists, Roosevelt seemed a different individual and politician. William Allen White, for one, was "astonished" at such openly defiant rhetoric, but he knew Roosevelt was sincere.

Roosevelt was delighted at the turn of events and the fact that his political opponent, Boss Platt, had lost his political right arm (McKinley) in national politics. William Allen White visited Washington, D.C. to write a profile of Boss Platt for McClure's Magazine and met up with Lincoln Steffens. When White returned to Kansas, he noted that he'd used "my best and most burning adjectives expressing my scorn...

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This section contains 1,264 words
(approx. 4 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism Study Guide
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