Study Guide

The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism - Chapter 9: "Governor and Governor General" Summary & Analysis

Doris Kearns Goodwin
This Study Guide consists of approximately 84 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism.
This section contains 1,096 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism Study Guide

Summary

Roosevelt was inaugurated governor of New York Jan. 2, 1899 on a great tide of public approval. Roosevelt reached out to old friend Lincoln Steffens and offered "an understanding" by which the journalist would, in effect, serve as the governor's media manager in exchange for unlimited access to the inner working of government and to the levers of political power. Their bond reached back to Roosevelt's tour of New York City tenements, guided by Steffens, when he was police commissioner. Such an arrangement in modern times would be considered unethical and probably cause the journalist to be cast out of the profession.

Regardless of ethics, their partnership proved effective in building up a head of steam for progressive, reform politics in New York State. When Roosevelt consulted labor leaders about their objectives, he was told that enforcement of existing labor laws would...

(read more from the Chapter 9: "Governor and Governor General" Summary)

This section contains 1,096 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism from BookRags. (c)2016 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook