Study Guide

The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism - Chapter 6: "The Insider and the Outsider" Summary & Analysis

Doris Kearns Goodwin
This Study Guide consists of approximately 84 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism.
This section contains 964 words
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Summary

Taft and Roosevelt became fast friends, as well as neighbors, and began walking together to work each day in Washington. Sometimes they lunched together, Roosevelt talking a blue streak and eating indifferently, Taft savoring every mouthful of his abundant meal. Taft had the temperament of a draft horse, Roosevelt that of a race horse, and yet because of opposite attraction they develop a deep and genuine friendship. Roosevelt was impressed with Taft's character; as an example, Taft had offered his resignation as revenue collector rather than fire a man in his department because of his (Democratic) party affiliation.

The blatant cronyism of Washington across the board offended both men, and they formed common cause in their desire for political reform. Roosevelt, the more flashy and egocentric of the two, gained fast attention because of his campaign to rid the...

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This section contains 964 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism Study Guide
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