Study Guide

The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism - Chapter 2: "Will and Teedie" Summary & Analysis

Doris Kearns Goodwin
This Study Guide consists of approximately 84 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism.
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Summary

Theodore Roosevelt was born into wealth as a result of the family's successful import-export business. A product of private schools and Yale University, Roosevelt seemed to exude plenty of the optimism that also characterized his cousin, Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Theodore went all out for sports, the social life, symbolic acts of manhood such as hunting; he professed a real empathy and concern for the common, working man. As a child, Roosevelt earned the nickname of "Teedie" among his numerous cousins and extended family. Teedie was a strong, outgoing personality seemingly without fear compared with the measured, cautious demeanor of Taft who seemed naturally shy and self-possessed.

Taft was the perfect "good boy" as a child: he worked hard at his studies and at extracurricular activities, earning the approval of his peers and parents. Although Taft was not yet obese, his childhood...

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This section contains 1,004 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism Study Guide
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