The Broken Spears 2007 Revised Edition: The Aztec Account of the Conquest of Mexico Summary & Study Guide

This Study Guide consists of approximately 21 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Broken Spears 2007 Revised Edition.
This section contains 513 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Broken Spears 2007 Revised Edition: The Aztec Account of the Conquest of Mexico Study Guide

The Broken Spears 2007 Revised Edition: The Aztec Account of the Conquest of Mexico Summary & Study Guide Description

The Broken Spears 2007 Revised Edition: The Aztec Account of the Conquest of Mexico Summary & Study Guide includes comprehensive information and analysis to help you understand the book. This study guide contains the following sections:

This detailed literature summary also contains Topics for Discussion on The Broken Spears 2007 Revised Edition: The Aztec Account of the Conquest of Mexico by Miguel León-Portilla.

"The Broken Spears 2007 Revised Edition: The Aztec Account of the Conquest of Mexico" by Miguel Leon-Portilla is an account of the years 1519-1521 when Cortes and his men entered Mexico and began conquering it. The tale is told from the writings and images of the people who were conquered.

The Indians in Mexico had a thriving culture. They established a city in 1325 and then set out to conquer more territories, taking captives along the way so they could sacrifice them to appease their god. By the time the Spaniards arrived in 1519, the markets and the economy were strong, the people were educated, and the architectural structures were breathtaking.

Cortes landed on the coast at Veracruz on April 22, 1519. By August 13, 1521, the Aztec capital had surrendered to him. Still, there were signs of trouble ten years before the Spaniard showed up on their shores. Strange omens appeared, making the ruler and the people uneasy. When the Spaniards arrived, the people thought they were gods and greeted with gifts and sacrifices. The Spaniards were repelled by the sacrifices.

The Spaniards moved inland. The people of Tlaxcala greeted them with gifts and friendship. They had tried to make peace with the people in Cholula, but their messenger was tortured and sent back to them. They shared this with Cortes who promised to help them get revenge. As a united force, they went to Cholula. They met with their enemy in the courtyard of the god. They shut off the entrances and massacred the people of Cholula. Those who were not killed were so filled with terror that they dove off the edge of the temple grounds down to their own death.

The Spaniards and the Tlaxcaltecas moved further inland toward Tenochtitlan. Motecuhzoma sent envoys with gold and the natives observed how the Spaniards lusted after the gold. Prince Ixtlilxochitl persuaded the people of Tezcoco to join forces with the conquistadors as they continued marching to Tenochtitlan. He became a Christian and Cortes was his godfather. His people felt their god was not as strong as the god of the Spaniards.

They arrived at Texcoco, near Tenochtitlan, and Motecuhzoma went to greet them as friends. The Spaniards told the king he had nothing to fear. He brought them into the city and they placed him under guard. The people were terrified and lost respect for their king as he commanded them to give the Spaniards whatever they needed. Cortes and his men raided the coffers.

Cortes left to fight a man sent out to arrest him. While he was gone, the people petitioned the Spanish for the chance to have a fiesta. It was an important religious ceremony for them. With permission, they prepared and began to sing and dance. The soldiers attacked and brutally killed the celebrants. Cortes came back, and the next day the Indians battled the Spaniards, driving them out of the city. When they returned from the battles as victors, they were weakened by a plague. The Spanish attacked once again while they were weak and took over the city.

Read more from the Study Guide

This section contains 513 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Broken Spears 2007 Revised Edition: The Aztec Account of the Conquest of Mexico Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
The Broken Spears 2007 Revised Edition: The Aztec Account of the Conquest of Mexico from BookRags. (c)2016 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.