Aleister Crowley Writing Styles in The Book of Lies, Which Is Also Falsely Called Breaks: The Wanderings of Falsifications of the One Thought of Frat

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Point of View

Crowley uses a variety of different points of view in the book. Since most of the book is not a narrative, it would be incorrect to call Crowley a narrator, but he frequently writes from an omniscient perspective. For most of the book, Crowley explains the structure of the universe, the nature of the gods, and how humans should behave with the air of complete authority. Occasionally, Crowley gives his advice in the form of a parable but for the most part it is delivered directly, but it never shows any doubt on Crowley's part. In a few chapters, Crowley even goes so far as to write from the point of view of God or a god.

However, in the sections that are personal narrative, Crowley shows doubts and failings, demonstrating that he is less than omniscient and bringing into question the accuracy of the other...

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This section contains 910 words
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