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The Best War Ever: America and World War II Chapter Summary & Analysis - Chapter Five: Overseas Summary

Michael C.C. Adams
This Study Guide consists of approximately 36 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Best War Ever.
This section contains 723 words
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Chapter Five: Overseas Summary and Analysis

Many American soldiers seemed childish to Europeans. They would chew gum, read comics, and play ball like big kids. The American war machine was powerful but had little regard for saving landscape and structures dear to Europeans. Many GIs were rude and contemptuous of Europeans. Some even stole and looted but received little or no punishment for their actions. The sexual needs of the soldiers were not dealt with—allowing the creation of secret brothels. PR campaigns inferred that American boys were wholesome and did not need sex. In truth, GIs fathered tens of thousands of illegitimate children in England alone. The venereal disease rate soared in Europe. Alcoholism was a problem, partially due to the Army's attempt to keep the soldiers from drinking at all. Drugs like amphetamines and Benzedrine were popular among the men. Psychological problems took their...

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This section contains 723 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Best War Ever: America and World War II Study Guide
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The Best War Ever: America and World War II from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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