The Best of Roald Dahl Characters

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The Best of Roald Dahl Summary & Study Guide Description

The Best of Roald Dahl Summary & Study Guide includes comprehensive information and analysis to help you understand the book. This study guide contains the following sections:

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Henry Sugarappears in The Wonderful Story of Henry Sugar

Henry Sugar is a character in "The Wonderful Story of Henry Sugar." He is a wealthy playboy who does no work and is only interested in gambling. He prefers to cheat when he gambles to ensure he wins and can add to his fortune. While at a friend's house, he discovers a notebook that reveals the secret to seeing without using your eyes through the yogi power of absolute concentration. Henry reads the book and begins meditation, hoping to use his power to cheat in casinos. He trains for several years until he is able to read through a playing card in just four seconds. However, once he obtains this power he finds that money does not have the same value. He plans to travel around the world, taking money from casinos and using it to set up orphanages with his friend and accountant, John Winston. His plan works for several years until the mob catches up with him. After a narrow escape, Henry meets a make-up artist, Max Engleman, who is able to disguise him and help him continue his quest. Henry eventually dies as an elderly man after setting up 20 orphanages in all of the countries he visited, his life's work complete.

Imhrat Khanappears in The Wonderful Story of Henry Sugar

Imhrat Khan is a character in "The Wonderful Story of Henry Sugar." He is an Indian who leaves home at a young age, following a magician. He soon learns all the tricks are just illusions, but practices with the magician until he hears about yogis, who can truly do magic with meditation. Khan leaves to find a yogi, following a disciple to learn where a yogi lives. He observes the yogi floating above the ground and asks him to be his master. The yogi refuses and kicks Khan out, but after several days relents and tells Khan the name of a yogi he can train with. Khan does this and obtains yogi powers using absolute concentration. He meditates on a certain object, such as his brother's face, while staring at the black of a candle, not letting his mind wander to anything else. He does this until he manages to see objects without using his eyes, and proves his talent by walking over coals. Khan joins a traveling performance and becomes the headliner. When they arrive in Bombay, he goes to the hospital and has Dr. John Cartwright and a colleague bandage his eyes before a performance. After the show, he tells Dr. Cartwright how he obtained yogi powers, but Khan later dies in his sleep.

John F. Cartwrightappears in The Wonderful Story of Henry Sugarv

John F. Cartwright is a character in "The Wonderful Story of Henry Sugar." He is a doctor in Bombay, India, who covers up Imhrat Kahn as a publicity stunt before Khan's person. He then goes to see Khan's show, after which Khan tells him how he came by the ability to see without his eyes.

John Winstonappears in The Wonderful Story of Henry Sugar

John Winston is a character in "The Wonderful Story of Henry Sugar." He is Henry's accountant and helps Henry set up orphanages with the money he wins at casinos.

Max Englemanappears in The Wonderful Story of Henry Sugar

Max Engleman is a character in "The Wonderful Story of Henry Sugar." He is a make-up artist who travels with Henry Sugar to disguise him from casino owners who may want to hurt Henry after Henry uses his powers at their casino.

Stagappears in Madame Rosette

Stag is a character in "Madame Rosette." He is a fighter pilot during World War II. He and Stuffy are vacationing in Cairo when he introduces Stuffy to Madame Rosette's brothel. Stag later helps Stuffy raid the brothel and free the girls working there.

Stuffyappears in Madame Rosette

Stuffy is a character in "Madame Rosette." He is a fighter pilot during World War II. He and Stag are vacationing in Cairo when Stag introduces him to Madame Rosette's brothel. Stuffy calls the brothel so Madame Rosette can hook him up with a girl he saw working at a sunglasses stand. However, he later changes his mind and has Stuffy call it off. He decides to raid the brothel with Stuffy and William and they free all the girls working there.

Williamappears in Madame Rosette

William is a character in "Madame Rosette." He is a fighter pilot during World War II. Stag and Stuffy meet him in a bar and get him to come with them as they free the prostitutes under Madame Rosette's control.

Madame Rosetteappears in Madame Rosette

Madame Rosette is the title character in "Madame Rosette." She runs a brothel in Cairo, blackmailing girls into working for her as whores. Stag, Stuffy, and William invade the brothel and lock Madame Rosette in her office, freeing all the girls working for her.

The Englishmanappears in Man from the South

The Englishman is a character in "Man from the South." He is the narrator of the story and is not mentioned by name. He witnesses the bet between the South American and the American sailor.

The South Americanappears in Man from the South

The South American is a character in "Man from the South." He is not mentioned by name. He bets the American sailor that his lighter will not light ten times in a row. He demands the sailor's finger if he loses, but if the sailor wins, he will give him his car. He is revealed to be mentally ill and has made this bet with several people.

The American sailorappears in Man from the South

The American sailor is a character in "Man from the South." He is not mentioned by name. The South American bets him that his lighter will not light ten times in a row. The sailor must give up his finger if he lose, but will win the South American's car. The bet is never completed, since a woman reveals the South American is mentally ill and has nothing to pay off the bet.

Klausnerappears in The Sound Machine

Klausner is a character in "The Sound Machine." He is a possibly mentally unstable man who invents a machine that amplifies sound. He hears the sounds of flowers and trees screaming when they are picked or cut, and is deeply disturbed by this newfound knowledge.

Scottappears in The Sound Machine

Scott is a doctor and a character in "The Sound Machine." He is acquainted with Klausner, and may even be his doctor since Klausner sometimes seems unstable. Klausner shows him his sound machine.

Mrs. Saundersappears in The Sound Machine

Mrs. Saunders is a character in "The Sound Machine." She is wary of Klausner, but definitely thinks he's crazy after he tries to convince her that plants can scream.

Richard Prattappears in Taste

Richard Pratt is a character in "Taste." He is a wine gourmet. During a dinner at Mike Schofield's home, Mike bets his daughter's hand in marriage against Richard Pratt's two homes; Pratt must guess the year and vineyard a certain wine is from. Pratt draws the process out but guesses correctly. He is revealed as a cheater when the Schofield's maid gives him back his glasses that he had left in the room where the wine was stored.

Louiseappears in Taste

Louise is a character in "Taste." She is the daughter of Mike Schofield. Her father bets her hand in marriage against Richard Pratt's two homes; Pratt must guess the year and vineyard a certain wine is from.

William Botibolappears in Dip in the Pool

William Botibol is a character in "Dip in the Pool." He tries to fix the nightly auction, where passengers guess how many miles they will travel that day, while on a cruise ship. He falls overboard to slow the ship down, but no one rescues him.

Drioliappears in Skin

Drioli is a character in "Skin." He was friends with Chaim Soutine, a famous painter, and has a work of Soutine tattooed on his back. He shows the painting to several men in a gallery, and one of the men convinces Drioli to come back to his hotel and show his back to tourists. However, he kills Drioli and sells the painting.

Chaim Soutineappears in Skin

Chaim Soutine or the Kalmuck is a character in "Skin." He is a famous painter who tattoos a portrait of Drioli's wife on his friend Drioli's back.

Josieappears in Skin

Josie is a character in "Skin." She is the wife of Drioli. The painter Chaim Soutine tattoos a picture of her on Drioli's back.

The strangerappears in Skin

The stranger is a character in "Skin." He tempts Drioli with food and the possibility of a life of luxury to get Drioli to come with him. However, he kills Drioli to get the painting off his back and sell it.

Louisaappears in Edward the Conqueror

Louisa is a character in "Edward the Conqueror." She finds a cat who she believes is the composer, Franz Liszt reincarnated.

Edwardappears in Edward the Conqueror

Edward is a character in "Edward the Conqueror." He gets sick of his wife's belief that a cat is the composed, Franz Liszt, reincarnated. He possibly throws the cat in a bonfire to get rid of it.

Franz Lisztappears in Edward the Conqueror

Franz Liszt is a composer and a character in "Edward the Conqueror." His spirit is ostensibly reincarnated into a cat.

Mary Maloneyappears in Lamb to the Slaughter

Mary Maloney is a character in "Lamb to the Slaughter." Pregnant with their first child, she bludgeons her husband, Patrick, to death with a leg of lamb after he tells her he has been cheating on her. She then cooks the lamb and feeds to the policeman investigating her husband's death.

Patrick Maloneyappears in Lamb to the Slaughter

Patrick Maloney is a character in "Lamb to the Slaughter." He tells his wife, Mary, that he has been cheating on her, and she bludgeons her husband to death with a leg of lamb.

William Perkinsappears in Galloping Foxley

William Perkins is the narrator of "Galloping Foxley." He enjoys a regular commute to work until a man disturbs his routine. Perkins believes the man is a boy named Foxley. who had tormented him while in school, but he learns he is incorrect when he confronts the man.

Bruce Foxleyappears in Galloping Foxley

Bruce Foxley is a character in "Galloping Foxley." He used to torment William Perkins when they were both boys at school.

Jocelyn Fortescueappears in Galloping Foxley

Jocelyn Fortescue is a character in "Galloping Foxley." He begins commuting to work the same time as William Perkins, but is not the boy, Foxley, that used to torment William Perkins.

Mrs. Fosterappears in The Way Up to Heaven

Mrs. Foster is a character in "The Way Up to Heaven." She is neurotic about being on time for things, although her husband likes to torment her by forcing her to be late. When her husband gets stuck in the elevator at their home, Mrs. Foster leaves him there while she goes on her six-week trip.

Mr. Fosterappears in The Way Up to Heaven

Mr. Foster is a character in "The Way Up to Heaven." He likes to torment her wife by forcing her to be late even though she is neurotic about being on time. He gets stuck in an elevator, and Mrs. Foster leaves him alone.

Mr. Boggisappears in Parson's Pleasure

Mr. Boggis is a character in "Parson's Pleasure." He pretends to be a reverend to get people to sell him their antique furniture more cheaply. However, he gets his comeuppance when some men he swindles chop up the cabinet he bought from them so it fits in their car.

Billy Weaverappears in The Landlady

Billy Weaver is a character in "The Landlady." He looks for a boarding house and stays in a small place, run by an elderly woman.

The landladyappears in The Landlady

The landlady is a character in "The Landlady." She goes unnamed, but runs a bed and breakfast where Billy Weaver comes to stay. She apparently kills and stuffs the people who come to stay with her.

William Pearlappears in William and Mary

William Pearl is a character in "William and Mary." He is a strict husband to Mary. He dies and leaves his body to the science department of Oxford. Dr. Landy detaches William's brain from his body.

Mary Pearlappears in William and Mary

Mary Pearl is a character in "William and Mary." She has been browbeaten by her husband, William, for years. However, when his brain and one eye is removed and kept alive after his death, she enjoys the thought of her husband having to watch her enjoying all the things he has forbidden her to do.

Landyappears in William and Mary

Landy is a character in "William and Mary." He removes William's brain and one eye after William's death and keeps them alive.

Mrs. Bixbyappears in Mrs. Bixby and the Colonel's Coat

Mrs. Bixby is a character in "Mrs. Bixby and the Colonel's Coat." She is cheating on her husband with the Colonel, who gives her a mink coat after their last tryst. She gives the coat to a pawn shop, pretending she found the ticket on the seat. However, her husband gets the better of her by giving the coat to his secretary, Miss Pulteney, and only giving his wife a cheap mink neckwrap.

Mr. Bixbyappears in Mrs. Bixby and the Colonel's Coat

Mr. Bixby is a character in "Mrs. Bixby and the Colonel's Coat." He takes a ticket his wife supposedly found on the train and finds the mink coat she received from the Colonel. He gives the coat to his secretary, Miss Pulteney, who he is apparently having an affair with.

The Colonelappears in Mrs. Bixby and the Colonel's Coat

The Colonel is a character in "Mrs. Bixby and the Colonel's Coat." He is Mrs. Bixby's lover.

Miss Pulteneyappears in Mrs. Bixby and the Colonel's Coat

Miss Pulteney is a character in "Mrs. Bixby and the Colonel's Coat." She is apparently having an affair with Dr. Bixby.

Albert Taylorappears in Royal Jelly

Albert Taylor is a character in "Royal Jelly." The husband of Mabel, he takes royal jelly, a powerful substance made by bees, to cure his impotency and his daughter's hunger. Soon, Albert begins to resemble a bee.

Mabel Taylorappears in Royal Jelly

Mabel Taylor is a character in "Royal Jelly." She is shocked to her learn her husband, Albert, has used royal jelly on himself and their daughter to further their development.

The Reverendappears in Georgy Porgy

The Reverend is a character in "Georgy Porgy." He is afraid of women, stemming from his mother's death and a horrible experience watching a rabbit eat its own young. The reverend finds himself attracted to a Miss Roach, but she tries to kiss him and he goes crazy, ending up in a mental hospital.

Miss Roachappears in Georgy Porgy

Miss Roach is a character in "Georgy Porgy." She tries to come on the the reverend, but when she goes to kiss him, he panics.

Klara Hitlerappears in Genesis and Catastrophe

Klara Hitler is a character in "Genesis and Catastrophe." Klara gives birth to Adolf Hitler, her fourth child, and is afraid she will lose him because her other three children have died. She is based on the real-life mother of Adolf Hitler, the German dictator who perpetrated the Holocaust and World War II.

Alois Hitlerappears in Genesis and Catastrophe

Alois Hitler is a character in "Genesis and Catastrophe." He is the father of Adolf Hitler, based on his real-life father. Adolf Hitler is the German dictator who perpetrated the Holocaust and World War II.

Adolf Hitlerappears in Genesis and Catastrophe

Adolf Hitler is a character in "Genesis and Catastrophe." He is the real-life German dictator who perpetrated the Holocaust and World War II.

Lexingtonappears in Pig

Lexington is a character in "Pig." He is raised by his Aunt Glosspan to be a vegetarian. He is killed during a tour of a slaughterhouse as a pig would be.

Aunt Glosspanappears in Pig

Aunt Glosspan is a character in "Pig." She raises Lexington to be a vegetarian and a cook.

The narratorappears in The Visitor

The narrator is a character in "The Visitor." He is the nephew of Uncle Oswald and receives Oswald's diaries after his death.

Uncle Oswaldappears in The Visitor

Uncle Oswald is a character in "The Visitor." He is an adventurer and an ardent lover of the ladies. During a trip to Sinai, he stays with a man called Aziz. A woman comes into him and the night and they make love, but it turns out to be Aziz's daughter who has leprosy.

Azizappears in The Visitor

Aziz is a character in "The Visitor." He invites Oswald to stay in his house for the night after Oswald's car breaks down. He has two daughters, one who has leprosy.

Claud Cubbageappears in Claud's Dog

Claud Cubbage is a character in "Claud's Dog," a series of stories that revolve around him. He dates Clarice, and he and his friend Gordon have a plan to make money by switching greyhounds in a swindle.

The Ratcatcherappears in Claud's Dog

The Ratcatcher is a character in "Claud's Dog." He kills rats for a living, showing and telling Claud how he does it.

Jackieappears in Claud's Dog

Jackie is a character in "Claud's Dog." He is Claud's greyhound and races under the name, "The Black Panther."

Mr. Rumminsappears in Claud's Dog

Mr. Rummins is a character in "Claud's Dog." He made a hayrick with his son Bert and Claud, and somehow the body of Old Jimmy ended up inside.

Old Jimmyappears in Claud's Dog

Old Jimmy is a character in "Claud's Dog." He disappeared after Mr. Rummins made the hayrick near Claud's house. His body is later found in the hayrick.

Bertappears in Claud's Dog

Bert is a character in "Claud's Dog." He is Mr. Rummins' son and finds Old Jimmy's body in the hayrick.

Clariceappears in Claud's Dog

Clarice is a character in "Claud's Dog." She is the daughter of Mr. Hoddy and dates Claud Cubbage.

Mr. Hoddyappears in Claud's Dog

Mr. Hoddy is a character in "Claud's Dog." He is the father of Clarice and doesn't think much of Claud Cubbage.

Mr. Feaseyappears in Claud's Dog

Mr. Feasey is a character in "Claud's Dog." He is the owner of the racing track and is good at spotting ringers.

Mr. Victor Hazelappears in Claud's Dog

Mr. Victor Hazel is a character in "Claud's Dog." He has an annual pheasant shooting party, which Claud Cubbage and Gordon try to wreck.

Bessie Organappears in Claud's Dog

Bessie Organ is a character in "Claud's Dog." She helps Claud Cubbage smuggle pheasants he has poached.

Vic Hammondappears in The Great Switcheroo

Vic Hammond is a character in "The Great Switcheroo." His wife is Mary. He engineers a plan to switch with Jerry Rainbow, his neighbor, so they can have sex with each other's wives. Vic has sex with Samantha, but when he gets back to Mary, he learns she prefers sex with Jerry to sex with him.

Mary Hammondappears in The Great Switcheroo

Mary Hammond is a character in "The Great Switcheroo." She is the wife of Vic, who switches with his neighbor Jerry so Jerry can have sex with Mary. However, Mary prefers Jerry's style of lovemaking.

Jerry Rainbowappears in The Great Switcheroo

Jerry Rainbow is a character in "The Great Switcheroo." He is married to Samantha, but switches with Vic so he can have sex with Vic's wife, Mary.

Samantha Rainbowappears in The Great Switcheroo

Samantha Rainbow is a character in "The Great Switcheroo." She is Jerry's wife. Vic switches with Jerry so he can have sex with Samantha.

Davidappears in The Boy who talked with Animals

David is a character in the "The Boy who talked with Animals." He saves the giant turtle from being killed by the fishermen who caught it. He later escapes with the turtle, living with it on a desert island.

The Narratorappears in The Hitchhiker

The narrator is a character in "The Hitchhiker." He goes unnamed, but is driving his new BMW when he picks up the Hitchhiker. He gets pulled over by a cop, but the hitchhiker manages to steal the cop's notebooks, putting both men in the clear.

The Hitchhikerappears in The Hitchhiker

The hitchhiker is a character in "The Hitchhiker." He calls himself a fingersmith, and showcases his talent for the narrator. He also steals the notebook from a cop who pulls the narrator over.

The Copappears in The Hitchhiker

The cop is a character in "The Hitchhiker." He gives the narrator a ticket for speeding and berates him.

Mr. William Buggageappears in The Bookseller

Mr. William Buggage is a character in "The Bookseller." He and his assistant, Miss Tottle, have been swindling the widows of prominent men for years by sending letters requesting payment for books with questionable, erotic titles. They use to money to finance vacations to exotic locales, but are foiled when they accidentally request payment from the widow of a blind man.

Miss Muriel Tottleappears in The Bookseller

Miss Muriel Tottle is a character in "The Bookseller." She and her boss, Mr. William Buggage, have been swindling the widows of prominent men for years by sending letters requesting payment for books with questionable, erotic titles. They use to money to finance vacations to exotic locales, but are foiled when they accidentally request payment from the widow of a blind man.

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