The Bell Curve: Intelligence and Class Structure in American Life - Chapter 22, A Place for Everyone Summary & Analysis

Richard Herrnstein
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Chapter 22, A Place for Everyone Summary and Analysis

In the final chapter, the authors advocate policies they believe will help to thwart the coming trends. They argue that the ideology of egalitarianism must be rejected. While some forms of equality are ideal, such as the idea of equal rights, the idea that people should be equal regardless of their choices is pernicious. Further, a good sort of equality must be advocated: equality of authority, where individuals are allowed to govern themselves.

Individuals should be allowed to find valued places in society. Inevitably letting the process of cognitive migration work itself out will help make society more productive. Further, individual freedom will allow individuals with varied IQs to find places in society where they are valued.

The authors argue that the end of the twentieth century United States has a series of...

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This section contains 276 words
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