The Bell Curve: Intelligence and Class Structure in American Life - Chapter 11, Crime, Chapter 12, Civility and Citizenship Summary & Analysis

Richard Herrnstein
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Chapter 11, Crime, Chapter 12, Civility and Citizenship Summary and Analysis

Criminals have different IQ distributions than the generate population. Criminals have an average IQ of 92, eight points below average. The most serious and frequent offenders have even lower IQs. IQ-criminality ties are especially acute with young men. The differences between those getting caught and getting away with their crimes are not significant. Socioeconomic status is not a major explanatory factor. High IQ often protects against relapsing into criminal behavior. Turbulent homes and criminal parents will less likely follow their parents if they have high IQs. Low IQ predicts criminal behavior and socioeconomic background was a negligible risk when controlled for IQ.

To maintain a free society, citizens must participate in civic enterprises, be it elections or being a good neighbor. Without civility, a society will require coercion to sustain the social...

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This section contains 289 words
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