The Bell Curve: Intelligence and Class Structure in American Life - Introduction Summary & Analysis

Richard Herrnstein
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Introduction Summary and Analysis

'Intelligence' is something real that differs between people, it is a universal and ancient quality. But over the last thirty years, the idea of intelligence has become unpopular and politically incorrect. Initially, the study of intelligence was stimulated by the Darwinian theory of evolution.

Darwin's young cousin, Sir Francis Dalton, wanted a precise way to measure intelligence and tried to develop an intelligence test. While he failed, his successor, Alfred Binet, developed the first successful test. Later, Charles Spearman discovered a method of correlating the ability to form well on tests with a single variable, 'g', which came to stand for intelligence. Then David Wechsler invented another intelligence test, the WISC, in the 1930s.

Once the 1960s arrived, a controversy concerning intelligence testing arose. Powerful social democratic movements arose that believed in the equality of all people, regardless of any evidence...

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This section contains 383 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy The Bell Curve: Intelligence and Class Structure in American Life Study Guide
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