Forgot your password?  

The Anti-Federalist Papers; and, the Constitutional Convention Debates Study Guide & Plot Summary

This Study Guide consists of approximately 38 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Anti-Federalist Papers; and, the Constitutional Convention Debates.
This section contains 358 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Anti-Federalist Papers; and, the Constitutional Convention Debates Study Guide

The Anti-Federalist Papers; and, the Constitutional Convention Debates Summary & Study Guide Description

The Anti-Federalist Papers; and, the Constitutional Convention Debates Summary & Study Guide includes comprehensive information and analysis to help you understand the book. This study guide contains the following sections:

This detailed literature summary also contains Topics for Discussion and a Free Quiz on The Anti-Federalist Papers; and, the Constitutional Convention Debates by .

Plot Summary

The Anti-Federalist Papers is a compilation of the debates over the American form of government between 1787 and 1790. This period of time began with increasing dissatisfaction with The Articles of Confederation, which were the law of the land from 1777 to 1789. Many saw the Articles of Confederation as failing to provide the federal government with sufficient power for a variety of reasons, including its inability to pay off debts and collect revenue, prevent state skirmishes and resolve other conflicts. During this time there was an enormous debate about how American government should be structured.

What is notable about this period is that all the participants have the same goal: to preserve as much human liberty as possible. However, they disagree significantly upon the means. Some believe the federal government needs more power over the states, others less than what the proposed Constitution provides. Some prefer more democratic modes of government, giving the people power over their politicians. Yet others prefer more republican institutions, where there are various restrictions on democratic control. There are the traditional conflicts between large and small state representation. There are significant debates over how to separate power, and how to restrain the power of particular branches of government. All of these debates come to a head at the Constitutional Convention of 1787 and the subsequent ratification process.

The Anti-Federalist Papers is a collection of the records of the constitutional convention, documents of the subsequent ratification debates, and the following proposed amendments to the Constitution. After the introduction, the book has two parts. Part I is the entire record of the federal convention of 1787, ranging from April 16th to September 17th, 1787. Part II presents the ratification debates, particularly the documents from the "anti-federalist" side or the side opposed to the ratification of the U.S. Constitution. Some of the most important documents of that period, The Federalist Papers, or papers written in support of the Constitution, are omitted and printed in a companion book. Thus the bulk of Part II is composed of the writings and speeches of the Anti-Federalists. The book ends with an appendix containing the Articles of Confederation and the U.S. Constitution.

Read more from the Study Guide

This section contains 358 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Anti-Federalist Papers; and, the Constitutional Convention Debates Study Guide
Copyrights
The Anti-Federalist Papers; and, the Constitutional Convention Debates from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook