The Adams-Jefferson Letters: The Complete Correspondence Between Thomas Jefferson and Abigail and John Adams - Chapter 10 Summary & Analysis

Lester J. Cappon
This Study Guide consists of approximately 27 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Adams-Jefferson Letters.
This section contains 373 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy The Adams-Jefferson Letters: The Complete Correspondence Between Thomas Jefferson and Abigail and John Adams Study Guide

The letters of chapter ten range from June 1813 to December 1813. In 1813, Jefferson told Adams that he had given up newspapers for the classics, science writings, and so on. Adams was more interested in theological and religious matters. Their wide-ranging minds were products of the Enlightenment. In 1813, however, important political events would draw the men's interest to political events. The War of 1812 was raging.

Adams still wrote on a number of political subjects. One of his constant concerns was how to control aristocracy. He recognized that aristocracies arose in all times and all places and thought they could not be eliminated and replaced by an aristocracy and Genius and Virtue. These concerns produced some of Jefferson's most important letters on aristocracy; he was optimistic about the ability of the electorate to choose the good and wise. He had high hopes for a future system of public...

(read more from the Chapter 10 Summary)

This section contains 373 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy The Adams-Jefferson Letters: The Complete Correspondence Between Thomas Jefferson and Abigail and John Adams Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
The Adams-Jefferson Letters: The Complete Correspondence Between Thomas Jefferson and Abigail and John Adams from BookRags. (c)2014 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook