Tender Buttons: Objects, Food, Rooms Characters

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Tender Buttons: Objects, Food, Rooms Summary & Study Guide Description

Tender Buttons: Objects, Food, Rooms Summary & Study Guide includes comprehensive information and analysis to help you understand the book. This study guide contains the following sections:

This detailed literature summary also contains Topics for Discussion on Tender Buttons: Objects, Food, Rooms by Gertrude Stein.

Gertrude Stein/narrator, appears in Objects

Gertrude Stein is the author and narrator of "Tender Buttons: Objects, Food and Rooms." In "Objects," she redefines words based on their etymology and an analysis of the syllables. She chooses words for their prosody and juxtaposes them in order to subvert common denotations. Gertrude Stein believes that the words have lost much of their expressive force and uses an unlikely combination of words to redefine each word. "Tender Buttons: Objects, Food and Rooms" can also be seen as a reworking of a patriarchal language from a feminist viewpoint. Gertrude Stein uses many puns and wordplays to allude to lesbian sexuality. She also uses color quite frequently in her writing. Gertrude Stein writes in a stream-of-consciousness style of writing that she deems word portraits, meant to convey a specific image. She often uses repetition and contrasting words to convey the image that she is trying to convey. Gertrude Stein's writing is highly stylized and idiosyncratic. It is a form of automatic writing and a complete break from literary tradition as it contains no plot or sentence structure.

Through the use of subtitles in "Objects," Gertrude Stein redefines fifty-eight words: "A Carafe, That Is a Blind Glass," "Glazed Glitter," "A Substance In A Cushion," "A Box," "A Piece of Coffee," "Dirt And Not Copper," "Nothing Elegant," "Mildred's Umbrella," "A Method Of A Cloak," "A Red Stamp," "A Box," "A Plate," "A Seltzer Bottle," "A Long Dress," "A Red Hat," "A Blue Coat," "A Piano," "A Chair," "A Frightful Release," "A Purse," "A Mounted Umbrella," "A Cloth," "More," "A New Cup And Saucer," "Objects," "Eye Glasses," "Cutlet," "Careless Water," "A Paper," "A Drawing," "Water Raining," "Cold Climate," "Malachite," "An Umbrella," "A Petticoat," "A Waist," "A Time To Eat," "A Little Bit Of A Tumbler", "A Fire", "A Handkerchief", "Red Roses", "In Between", "Colored Hats", "A Feather", "A Brown", "A Little Called Pauline," "A Sound," "A Table," "Shoes," "A Dog," "A White Hunter," "A Leave," "Suppose An Eyes," "A Shawl," "Book," "Peeled Pencil, Choke," "It Was Black, Black Took," and "This Is The Dress, Aider."

Gertrude Stein/narrator, appears in Food

Gertrude Stein is the author and narrator of "Tender Buttons: Objects, Food and Rooms." In "Food," she redefines words based on their etymology and an analysis of the syllables. She chooses words for their prosody and juxtaposes them in order to subvert common denotations. Gertrude Stein believes that the words have lost much of their expressive force and uses an unlikely combination of words to redefine each word. "Tender Buttons: Objects, Food and Rooms" can also be seen as a reworking of a patriarchal language from a feminist viewpoint. Gertrude Stein uses many puns and wordplays to allude to lesbian sexuality. She also uses color quite frequently in her writing. Gertrude Stein writes in a stream-of-consciousness style of writing that she deems word portraits, meant to convey a specific image. She often uses repetition and contrasting words to convey the image that she is trying to convey. Gertrude Stein's writing is highly stylized and idiosyncratic. It is a form of automatic writing and a complete break from literary tradition as it contains no plot or sentence structure.

Through the use of subtitles in "Food," Gertrude Stein redefines fifty-one words: "Roastbeef," "Mutton," "Breakfast," "Sugar," "Cranberries," "Milk," "Milk," "Eggs," "Apples," "Tails," "Lunch," "Cups," "Rhubarb," "Single Fish," "Cake," "Custard," "Potatoes," "Potatoes," "Roast Potatoes," "Asparagus," "Butter," "End Of Summer," "Sausages," "Celery," "Veal," "Vegetable," "Way Lay Vegetable," "Cooking," "Chicken," "Chicken," "Chicken," "Chicken," "Chain-boats," "Pastry," "Cream," "Cream," "Cucumber," "Dinner," "Dining," "Eating," "Eating," "Salad," "Sauce," "Salmon," "Orange," "Orange," "Oranges," "Orange In," "Salad Dressing And An Artichoke," "Salad Dressing And An Artichoke," and "A Centre In A Table."

Gertrude Stein/narrator, appears in Rooms

Gertrude Stein is the author and narrator of "Tender Buttons: Objects, Food and Rooms." In "Rooms," she redefines words based on their etymology and an analysis of the syllables. She chooses words for their prosody and juxtaposes them in order to subvert common denotations. Gertrude Stein believes that the words have lost much of their expressive force and uses an unlikely combination of words to redefine each word. "Tender Buttons: Objects, Food and Rooms" can also be seen as a reworking of a patriarchal language from a feminist viewpoint. Gertrude Stein uses many puns and wordplays to allude to lesbian sexuality. She also uses color quite frequently in her writing. Gertrude Stein writes in a stream-of-consciousness style of writing that she deems word portraits, meant to convey a specific image. She often uses repetition and contrasting words to convey the image that she is trying to convey. Gertrude Stein's writing is highly stylized and idiosyncratic. It is a form of automatic writing and a complete break from literary tradition as it contains no plot or sentence structure.

In "Rooms," Gertrude Stein redefines many words, without the use of subtitles such as in the first two poems. Some of these words are as follows: preparation, tune, more, shadow, truth, distribution, shame, permission, a blend, sister, time, birthday, absence of more, motion, stamp, collection, package, questions, cape, speech, silence, curtain, tribune, cadences, success, currents, religion, climate, lake, excellence, negligence, lecture, education, soldier, dance, back books, wideness, safe weight, surprise, and care.

Pauline, appears in Objects

In "A Little Called Pauline," a little is called Pauline. A little anything shows shudders. The narrator hopes for a peaceful life for Pauline to arise her. The narrator hopes Pauline has her cow.

My Dear, appears in Objects

In "A Table" the narrator tells my dear that a table means a whole steadiness.

White Hunter, appears in Objects

A white hunter is nearly crazy in "A White Hunter."

A Man, appears in Objects

In "Book," the narrator says to "suppose a man a realistic expression of resolute reliability suggests pleasing itself." She compares the man to kind wavers and a little chance to rest.

Student(s), appears in Food

In "Mutton," the student(s) are merciful and recognize that they chew something.

Monster, appears in Food

In "Mutton," the monster is not present. It is made a piece show, and the narrator wonders was it a kindness.

We, appears in Food

In "Cake," we came back to a dirty town because two bore mussed ash which meant cake which was a sign.

You, appears in Food

In "Way Lay Vegetable," you should have a skip and hurry up flutter.

Us, appears in Food

In "Dinner," the narrator asks to let us why, let us weight and let us why way.

George, appears in Food

In "Eating," George is a mass.

Waiter, appears in Food

In "A Centre In A Table," the waiter is next to a folder which is next to the narrator. The waiter is foldersome and should reletter and read her with her for less.

They, appears in Rooms

They do not eat who mention silver and sweet. They had no change and were not respected.

Author, appears in Rooms

The author of all that is in there behind the door, and that is entertaining in the morning.

Casual Acquaintance, appears in Rooms

Replacing a casual acquaintance with a daughter does not make a son.

Husband, appears in Rooms

Startling a starving husband is not disagreeable.

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