Christopher Marlowe Writing Styles in Tamburlaine the Great

This Study Guide consists of approximately 61 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Tamburlaine the Great.
This section contains 521 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Tamburlaine the Great Study Guide

In his prefatory tribute to the first folio edition of Shakespeare's plays, Ben Jonson cited (though in deference to Shakespeare) "Marlowe's mighty line," and critics tend to agree that Marlowe's innovation in verse was the first and most influential predecessor to the stylistic achievements of the era. It was Tamburlaine the Great that made this powerful verse style famous. Marlowe stresses in the prologue to part 1 that it is his intention to depart from the "jigging veins of rhyming mother wits," or unsophisticated rhymes like those of a mother giving silly advice in the form of a jig, of his predecessors. Instead, Marlowe wanted to create a work of high philosophical ambitions and powerful, "astounding" verse.

The poetic tool Marlowe uses for his "mighty line" is blank verse, or unrhymed iambic pentameter, which is a meter with five beats of two-syllable units called iambs. This style, adapted...

(read more from the Style section)

This section contains 521 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Tamburlaine the Great Study Guide
Copyrights
Drama for Students
Tamburlaine the Great from Drama for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.