Charles Dickens Writing Styles in A Tale of Two Cities

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Setting

The chief characteristic of A Tale of Two Cities that sets it apart from Dickens's other novels is its historical setting. Most of the author's works comment on contemporary English society; A Tale of Two Cities does this, too, but not as directly as, say, David Copperfield or Great Expectations. Dickens contrasts late eighteenth-century Paris and London both to advance the plot and to draw conclusions about the nature of freedom and the redeeming power of love. The novel begins in England, and most of the fIrst book takes place in that country. In the second book, chapters alternate between the English and the French settings, and the third is set almost entirely in France. "At the beginning of the novel,"' writes Ruth Glancy in A Tale of Two Cities.

Dickens's Revolutionary Novel, "Dickens paints a grim picture of both countries. They both had kings who believed...

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This section contains 756 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
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A Tale of Two Cities from Novels for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.