The Tale of Beatrix Potter Literary Qualities

Margaret Lane
This Study Guide consists of approximately 30 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Tale of Beatrix Potter.
This section contains 145 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy The Tale of Beatrix Potter Study Guide

Lane, a novelist, uses many of the techniques of fiction to write The Tale of Beatrix Potter. She creates well-defined characters, draws detailed scenes, and even constructs a sort of dialogue through extensive quotations from Potter's own letters and diaries. Lane draws on the memories of William Heelis, friends, cousins, and local people from the village of Sawrey to give this biography a very personal quality.

The narrator's affectionate and admiring voice is strong throughout. Lane recounts with respect and awe how the scholar Leslie Linder worked for years to decode the alphabet cipher that Potter used to write her journal. The reader gets both a sense of how difficult the decoding task was and a portrait of the adolescent Beatrix composing long, detailed journal entries in elaborate code, not because she is being secretive, but because she enjoys the difficulty of writing in code.

(read more from the Literary Qualities section)

This section contains 145 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy The Tale of Beatrix Potter Study Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
The Tale of Beatrix Potter from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.