Hồ Xuân Hương Writing Styles in Spring-Watching Pavilion

Hồ Xuân Hương
This Study Guide consists of approximately 21 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Spring-Watching Pavilion.
This section contains 414 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Spring-Watching Pavilion Study Guide

A lu-shih is a type of poem that was originally practiced by Chinese poets in classical times and which was borrowed by Vietnamese poets like Ho. A lu-shih is similar to the Italian sonnet—which itself has been borrowed by many poets writing in English. Like the sonnet, which consists of four- teen lines and which requires poets to adhere to a system of rules, the lu-shih is a rigid form of poetry. Lu-shihs, like "Spring-Watching Pavilion," always have eight lines, and each line always has seven syllables. Unfortunately, in Balaban's English translation, the syllable structure is one aspect that is sacrificed. Instead of seven syllables per line, each line in Balaban's version contains anywhere from seven to twelve syllables. In addition, in a lushih, rhymes generally occur at the end of the first, second, fourth, sixth, and eighth lines. This unyielding structure made lu-shihs a challenge to...

(read more from the Style section)

This section contains 414 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Spring-Watching Pavilion Study Guide
Copyrights
Poetry for Students
Spring-Watching Pavilion from Poetry for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook