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Ben Jonson Writing Styles in Song: To Celia

This Study Guide consists of approximately 22 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Song.
This section contains 358 words
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Style

Sound

Repetition of sounds in a poem can emphasize key words and images and so create poetic structure. In addition, sounds can provide pleasure. Jonson uses alliteration, the repetition of initial consonant sounds, in line 6 in the words “drink” and “divine” to emphasize the value the speaker places on his mistress's kiss. He repeats this technique in line 9 with the words “rosy” and “wreath,” which highlights her connection with nature. Jonson makes a clever connection between the speaker and his mistress through examples of consonance, the repetition of final consonant sounds, as well as word placement. He ends lines 2, 4, 6, and 8 with the words “mine,” “wine,” “divine,” and “thine,” respectively, suggesting that the union of the two would be more divine than wine. The placement of these rhyming words at the ends of the lines reinforces his point.

Language

The poem's popularity is most likely due to its use of...

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This section contains 358 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Song: To Celia Study Guide
Copyrights
Song: To Celia from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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