A Soldier's Play Historical Context

Charles H. Fuller
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In 1981, when Charles Fuller wrote A Soldier's Play, the United States military was fully integrated. In fact, the military services have been the largest equal opportunity employer of blacks for many years. But it was not always this way. Historically, blacks have been recruited into the military during wars but unceremoniously returned to civilian life once the war ended. World War II began in much the same way. For many blacks, there was no reason to want to involve themselves in this war. The experience in World War I had taught that once their services were no longer needed that blacks found they had gained nothing by their sacrifice. The freedoms they fought for were not theirs, and the country they defended rejected them. Consequently, many blacks saw World War II as a white man's war, but some, like Sergeant Waters, saw the war as an opportunity to...

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This section contains 617 words
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Buy the A Soldier's Play Study Guide
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A Soldier's Play from Drama for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.