Compare & Contrast Silas Marner by George Eliot

This Study Guide consists of approximately 26 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Silas Marner.
This section contains 535 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Silas Marner Study Guide

1810s: Each parish in England provides a workhouse to accommodate and employ the destitute. Conditions in the workhouses vary. Some are relatively acceptable, but others are grim. In 1810, George Crabbe writes of one workhouse: "It is a prison, with a milder name, / Which few inhabit without dread or shame."

1860s: Since the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834, hundreds of new workhouses have been built. They are supervised by a local Board of Guardians. Conditions in the workhouses are intentionally made harsh and degrading, to deter all but the most desperate. They are inhabited mainly by the old, the infirm, the sick, the orphaned, and unmarried mothers. The largest of them house over a thousand people.

Today: Workhouses no longer exist. They were abolished in 1930. People who in addition to being poor are sick, old, or mentally ill are cared for in hospitals and by social welfare organizations...

(read more)

This section contains 535 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Silas Marner Study Guide
Copyrights
Novels for Students
Silas Marner from Novels for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.