Shooting an Elephant Essay

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Bertonneau holds a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from UCLA and is the author of nearly forty scholarly articles exploring the anthropological aspects of American, European, and Classical poetry and prose. In the following essay, he tries to understand "Shooting an Elephant" in an anthropological and non-political way.

The proper question to pose regarding George Orwell's "Shooting an Elephant" is not: what does it tell us about the British Empire or the politics of imperialism? (That, in any case, is always a rhetorical question.) The question is, rather, what does Orwell's compact masterpiece tell us about human nature, and therefore about the universal morality which grows from an awareness of that nature? In answering this question, the critic might well stumble on some replies to the other, the usual, and by implication the misleading, question. For it is possible that the most important phenomenon of empire is simply...

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This section contains 2,335 words
(approx. 6 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Shooting an Elephant Study Guide
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