Shoeless Joe Essay

This Study Guide consists of approximately 81 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Shoeless Joe.
This section contains 3,813 words
(approx. 10 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Shoeless Joe Study Guide

In the following essay, Randall explores the 'fellow-feeling' of Kinsella's Shoeless Joe.

In his essay on Jean Paul Friedrich Richter, Thomas Carlyle writes of a humor that manifests itself in smile rather than laughter. "Richter is a man of mirth," says Carlyle, whose humor is "capricious . . . quaint . . . [and] heartfelt." The three adjectives represent for Carlyle the essence of what he terms "true humor" because they suggest Richter's enormous respect for humanity. "True humor," he goes on to say, "springs not more from the head than from the heart; it is not contempt, its essence is love; it issues not in laughter, but in still smiles, which lie far deeper." These smiles are not Hobbesian smirks of superiority but genuine signs of compassion for, sympathy toward, and empathy with the object of the humor. Carlyle further provides a direct link between humor and both pathos and nobility; the...

(read more)

This section contains 3,813 words
(approx. 10 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Shoeless Joe Study Guide
Copyrights
Gale
Shoeless Joe from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook